General Game-Making Resources


This bibliography was created with the help of Rachael Elrod and Cecilia Sirigos at The Citadel, Daniel Library and Mary Broussard of Lycoming College, Snowden Library.
star.jpgsymbol indicates a recommended introductory article/book.
  • Beavis, Catherine, and Joanne O'Mara. “Computer Games - Pushing at the Boundaries of Literacy.” Australian Journal of Language and Literacy 33, no. 1 (2010): 65-76.
  • Cinnamon, Ian. Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2008.
  • Gee, James Paul. Good Video Games + Good Learning: Collected Essays on Video Games. 27th ed. New York: Peter Lang, 2007.
  • ------. “Stories, Probes and Games.” Narrative Inquiry 21, no. 1 (2011): 353-357.
  • star.jpg------. What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Information. New York: Palgrave McMillan, 2007.
  • Jones, Steve. “Let the Games Begin: Gaming Technology and College Students” Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project. Last modified July 6, 2003. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2003/Let-the-games-begin-Gaming-technology-and-college-students.aspx
  • Kipnis, D. G. and G. M. Childs. “Educating Generation X and Generation Y.” Medical Reference Services Quarterly 23, no. 4 (2005): 25-33.
  • Sierra, Kathy and Bert Bates. Head First Java. 2nd ed. Sebastopol: O'Reilly Media, 2005.
  • Trefry, G. (2010). Casual game design : Designing play for the gamer in all of us. Amsterdam ; Boston: Morgan Kaufmann/Elsevier.

Games in Libraries


  • Adcock, A. (2008). Making digital game-based learning work: An instructional designer's perspective. Library Media Connection, 26(5), 56-57.
  • Battles, J., Glenn, V., & Shedd, L. (2011). Rethinking the library game: Creating an alternate reality with social media. Journal of Web Librarianship, 5(2), 114-131.
  • Branston, C. (2006). From game studies to bibliographic gaming: Libraries tap into the video game culture. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 32(4), 24-29.
  • Broussard, M.S. & McDevitt, T. (2012, May 4). "Fun Assessment: How to Embed Evaluation with Educational Games." Presentation at the Library Orientation Exchange (LOEX) Conference, Columbus, OH. Paper to be available in proceedings.
  • Broussard, M. J. S. (2012). Digital Games in Academic Libraries: A Review of Games and Suggested Best Practices. Reference Services Review, 40(1), 79-82.
  • Gregory, A. S. and Broussard, M. J. S. (March 31, 2011). "Unraveling the 'Mystery' of the Library: A 'Big Games' Approach to Library Orientation." Presentation at ACRL 2011, Philadelphia, PA. Paper available at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/national/2011/papers/unraveling_the_myste.pdf
  • Broussard, M. J. S. & Oberlin, J. U. (2011). Using Online Games to Fight Plagiarism: A Spoonful of Sugar Helps the Medicine Go Down. Indiana Libraries, 30(1), 20-21. Available at http://journals.iupui.edu/index.php/IndianaLibraries/article/view/1912/1823
  • Broussard, M. J. S. (2010). Secret Agents in the Library: Integrating Virtual and Physical Games in a Small Academic Library. College and Undergraduate Libraries, 17(1), 20.
  • Brown, Ann, Paola Ceccarini, and Cathy Eisenhower. “Muckrakers: Engaging Students in the Research Process Through an Online Game,” in ACRL Thirteenth National Conference Proceedings, ed. Hugh A. Thompson (Chicago: American Library Association, 2007): 226-236.
  • Clyde, J., & Thomas, C. (2008). Building an information literacy first-person shooter. Reference Services Review, 36(4), 366-380.
  • Doshi, Ameet. “How Gaming Could Improve Information Literacy.” Computers in Libraries 26, no. 5 (2006): 14-17.
  • star.jpgHarris, A. & Rice, S. E. (Eds.). (2008). Gaming in academic libraries: Collections, marketing, and information literacy. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries.
  • Kasbohm, Kristine E., David Schoen, and Michelle Dubaj. “Launching the Library Mystery Tour: A Library Component in the "First-Year Experience".” College & Undergraduate Libraries 13, no. 2 (2006): 35-46.
  • Kirriemuir, J. (2008). Teaching information literacy through digital games. In P. Godwin, and J. Parker (Eds.) Information Literacy meets Library 2.0 (pp. 153-164). London: Facet Publishing.
  • Leach, Guy J. and Tammy S. Sugarman. “Play to Win! Using Games in Library Instruction to Enhance Student Learning.” Research Strategies20, no. 3 (2005): 191-203.
  • Markey, K., Swanson, F., Jenkins, A., Jennings, B., St. Jean, B., Rosenberg, V., et al. (2009). Will undergraduate students play games to learn how to conduct library research? Journal of Academic Librarianship, 35(4), 303-313.
  • Markey, K. (2010). The benefits of integrating an information literacy skills game into academic coursework: A preliminary evaluation. D-Lib Magazine, 16(July/August). Retrieved August 2, 2011 from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/july10/markey/07markey.html
  • Martin, C., & Steinkuehler, C. (2010). Collective information literacy in massively multiplayer online games. eLearning and Digital Media, 7(4), 355-365.
  • Martin, Justine and Robin Ewing. “Power Up! Using Digital Gaming Techniques to Enhance Library Instruction.” Internet Reference Services Quarterly 12, no. 2-3 (2008): 209-225.
  • McDevitt, T. R. (2011). Let the games begin! : Engaging students with field-tested interactive information literacy instruction. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers.
  • Nicholson, S. (2010). Everyone plays at the library: Creating great gaming experiences for all ages. Medford, N.J: Information Today.
  • Schiller, N. (2008). A portal to student learning: What instruction librarians can learn from video game design. Reference Services Review, 36(4), 351-365.
  • Trefry, G. (2007). Big Fun, Big Learning: Transforming the World through Play. Keynote at GLLS2007. Slides and audio presentation availble at: http://www.alatechsource.org/blog/2007/08/audio-of-greg-trefrys-keynote-from-glls2007.html
  • star.jpgSmale, Maura A. “Learning Through Quests and Contests: Games in Information Literacy Instruction.” Journal of Library and Innovation 2, no. 2 (2011): 35-66.
  • Smith, Anna-Lise and Baker, Lesli A.(in press 2011). Getting a clue: Creating student detectives and dragon slayers in your library. Reference Services Review, 39(4).
  • Squire, K. and Steinkuehler, C. (2005). “Meet the gamers: they research, teach, learn, and collaborate. So far, without libraries” Library Journal, 130(7), 38-41.
  • VanLeer, L. (2006). Interactive gaming versus library tutorials for information literacy: A resource guide. Indiana Libraries, 25(4).
  • Waelchli, P. (2010). Playing with process: Video game choice as a model of behavior. Public Services Quarterly, 6(4), 380-388.
  • Waelchli, P. (2008). Librarians' sport of choice. College & Research Libraries News, 69(1), 10-15.